Sexually transmitted Infections and Young People in the United Kingdom: 2008 Report | National Resource for Infection Control (NRIC)

Sexually transmitted Infections and Young People in the United Kingdom: 2008 Report

Public leaflet, Surveillance data
Abstract: 
Key findings: Young people (aged 16-24 year sold) are the age group most at risk of being diagnosed with a sexually transmitted infection, accounting for 65% of all chlamydia, 50% of genital warts and 50% of gonorrhoea infections diagnosed in genitourinary medicine clinics across the UK in 2007. The most common sexually transmitted infection in young people is genital chlamydia. The National Chlamydia Screening Programme in England performed 270,729 screens in under 25 year olds in 2007: 9.5% of screens in women and 8.4% in men were positive for chlamydia. A further 79,557 diagnoses of genital Chlamydia infection were made among young people in genitourinary medicine clinics in the UK in 2007, (a rate of 1,102 per100,000 16-24 year olds), a rise of 7% on 2006. Genital warts were the second most commonly diagnosed sexually transmitted infection among young people in genitourinary medicine clinics, with 49,250 cases diagnosed in 2007 (682 per 100,000), a 8% rise on 2006. In 2007,702 young people were diagnosed with HIV,  representing 11% of all new HIV diagnoses. Young men who have sex with men remain the group of young people most at risk of acquiring HIV in the UK. Increases in diagnoses reflect greater ascertainment of cases through more testing and improved diagnostic methods, as well as indicating increased unsafe sexual behaviour among young people.
Authors: 
Health Protection Agency (HPA)
Category: 
Control
Epidemiology
Prevention
Public information