Surveillance of hospital-acquired bacteraemia in English Hospitals 1997-2002 | National Resource for Infection Control (NRIC)

Surveillance of hospital-acquired bacteraemia in English Hospitals 1997-2002

Surveillance data
Abstract: 
This report is a summary of the data reported by hospitals participating in the hospital-acquired bacteraemia module provided by the Nosocomial Infection National Surveillance Service (NINSS) between 1st May 1997 and 31st March 2002. This surveillance module was undertaken for a minimum of 3 months and included all patients admitted to an acute specialty for at least 24 hours. The report found that 3.5 patients per 1000 admissions developed bacteraemia and the mean bacteraemia rate was 0.6 per 1000 patient days. Over 66% were associated with medical devices, in particular central intravenous catheters
Authors: 
Health Protection Agency - Nosocomial Infection National Surveillance Service (NINSS)
Category: 
Epidemiology

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Summary:
Report of surveillance programme undertaken by the Nosocomial Infection National Surveillance Service (NINSS) involving 102 hospitals. This surveillance module was undertaken for a minimum of 3 months and included all patients admitted to an acute specialty for at least 24 hours. The report found that 3.5 patients per 1000 admissions developed bacteraemia and the mean bacteraemia rate was 0.6 per 1000 patient days. Over 66% were associated with medical devices, in particular central intravenous catheters
Questions Addressed:
Identification of the incidence of bacteraemias and associated risk factors using standard cases definitions and surveillance methods
Type of Study:
Epidemiological research
Methods Valid:
Yes
Methods Valid Detail:

Staff from participating hospitals received training by the research team in order to ensure methods aerw consistent across all sites. Standard forms and definitions were used, risk factors and causative organisms identified where possible and the data processed and analysed centrally by the research team

Results Reliability:
Yes
Problems or Biases:

There can be problems in multi centre research with consistency of methods and results etc but the research team tried to minimise this risk

Relevant Studies:

Emmerson AM, Enstone JE, Griffin M et al (1996) The second national prevalence survey of infections in hospitals - overview of results. Journal of Hospital Infection 32: 175 - 190. Glynn A, Ward V, Wilson J, Charlett A, Cookson B, Taylor L, Cole N (1997) Hospital Acquired Infection: Surveillance, Policies and Practice - a study of the control of hospital acquired infection in hospitals in England and Wales. London: PHLS

Keywords:
Bacteraemia surveillance hospital-acquired
Reviewer Name:
Janet McCulloch
Reviewer Post:
Regional Health Protection Nurse
Reviewer Affiliations:
Health Protection Agency South West